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March 21, 2016—

Space Shuttle Mission STS-126 Mouse Macrophage Transcription Profiling Study

Researchers profile transcriptional changes during differentiation of mouse primary bone marrow cells in microgravity

Primary cultures from mouse bone marrow were induced to differentiate by the presence of recombinant macrophage colony stimulating (rM-CSF) factor for 14-days during spaceflight. Cells were fixed to preserve RNA during flight and returned to Earth for transcriptional profiling using microarray analysis. Complementary analyses included cell proliferation studies and flow cytometry to detect antigens specific to the macrophage lineage.

This investigation was funded by the NASA Space Biology Program Office grant NNX08BA91G and also supported by the American Heart Association grant 0950036G, NIH grants AI55052, AI052206, AI088070, RR16475 and RR17686, the Jerry C. Johnson Center for Basic Cancer Research and the Kansas Agriculture Experiment Station.

image of bioserve fpa
The Bioserve Fluid Processing Apparatus (FPA) was used to culture bone marrow cells on STS-126
Evaluation of in vitro macrophage differentiation during space flight
Stephen Chapes, Ph.D; Kansas State University
Mus musculus
Transcription Profiling using Microarray
https://genelab-data.ndc.nasa.gov/genelab/accession/GLDS-50/






March 21, 2016—

Germinating Fern Spores Help Identify Genes Involved in Sensing and Responding to Gravity

Study looks at RNA at critical time point in gravity sensing response

During germination, a calcium current is triggered in the fern spore by a gravity sensing mechanism. The calcium current is part of a signalling cascade that orients the growth of the fern. Prior studies have determined that the critical timepoint for the gravity signal in the germination process occurs ten hours after the light signal that causes the onset of germination. In this study, transcriptional analysis was performed at ten hours post-germination to identify genes potentially important for the gravity response.

This study was supported by NASA Space Biology grants NNX09AH45G, NNX09AB41A, and NNX11AF48A to D. Marshall Porterfield and NSF grant IOS-1027514 to Stanley J. Roux

image of spore
A spore from the fern Ceratopteris richardii
RNA-Seq analysis identifies potential modulators of gravity response in Ceratopteris spores: Evidence for modulation by calcium pumps and apyrase activity
Stanley J. Roux, Ph.D.; University of Texas at Austin
Ceratopteris richardii
RNA-seq reference transcriptome, Ceratoperis, data released by GeneLab
https://genelab-data.ndc.nasa.gov/genelab/accession/GLDS-57/






March 21, 2016—

Additional Data from BRIC-19 Study on Arabidopsis Transcriptome

Data from this study were originally released on November 1, 2015 under GeneLab accession number GLDS-37. An additional dataset is now available for this study.

Comparison of the spaceflight transcriptome of four commonly used Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes
Simon Gilroy, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison
Arabidopsis thaliana
Transcription Profiling using RNAseq
https://genelab-data.ndc.nasa.gov/genelab/accession/GLDS-37/






March 21, 2016—

Microarray Analysis of Muscle on the Effect of Countermeasures During Bedrest

Woman skeletal muscle transcriptome with bed rest and countermeasures
Angele Chopard, Ph.D. Université de Montpellier, Montpelier, France
Homo sapiens
Transcription profiling using microarray
https://genelab-data.ndc.nasa.gov/genelab/accession/GLDS-51/






March 21, 2016—

European Space Agency Experiment Profiles Transcription of Human Endothelial Cells in Microgravity

Expression data from SPHINX (SPaceflight of Huvec: an INtegrated eXperiment)
Silvia Bradamante, Ph.D., Institute of Molecular Science and Technologies, Milan, Italy
Homo sapiens
Transcription profiling using microarray
https://genelab-data.ndc.nasa.gov/genelab/accession/GLDS-52/






March 21, 2016—

Microarray Study Compares Gene Expression in Astronaut Blood Samples Before and After Shuttle Missions

Spaceflight Modulates Gene Expression in Astronauts
Jennifer Barrila, Ph.D., Arizona State University
https://www.biodesign.asu.edu/jennifer-barrila
Homo sapiens
Transcription profiling using microarray
https://genelab-data.ndc.nasa.gov/genelab/accession/GLDS-53/






March 21, 2016—

STS-135 Study Models Immune Response to Spaceflight Using Human Endothelial Cells

Immune responses to the in vitro LPS assault engineered in the spaceflight multi-omics study
Meskerem Jibitu, US Army Center for Environmental Health Research, Fort Detrick, MD
Homo sapiens
Multi-omic analysis
https://genelab-data.ndc.nasa.gov/genelab/accession/GLDS-54/






March 21, 2016—

Ground Study Examines Changes in RNA in Human PBLs Cultured in Rotating Wall Vessels

microRNA expression profiles in human peripheral blood lymphocytes cultured in modeled microgravity
Gene expression profiling of human peripheral blood lymphocytes cultured in modeled microgravity
Maddalena Mognato, Ph.D., University of Padova, Italy
Homo sapiens
Transcription profiling by Microarray
https://genelab-data.ndc.nasa.gov/genelab/accession/GLDS-55/
https://genelab-data.ndc.nasa.gov/genelab/accession/GLDS-56/






December 16, 2015—

First Release of Epigenomic Data by GeneLab

Omics analyses of mouse liver in microgravity on the Rodent Research-1 payload

Liver is the metabolic hub of the vertebrate organ system and is involved in detoxification, regulation of glycogen storage, protein synthesis, and digestion, among other functions. Previous spaceflight experiments have demonstrated many changes in liver gene expression and in the activity of liver enzymes. GeneLab engaged in a sample sharing mission with the Rodent Research-1 (RR-1) project (GLDS-48) and with NASA's ISS National Lab managed by CASIS (GLDS-47) to provide tissue processing and extensive omics analyses on liver tissue from mice flown in microgravity. The RR-1 mission comprised the maiden voyage and validation of NASA's Rodent Research Hardware System. The RNA, protein, and DNA methylation data sets released here complement previous omics analyses from rodents in spaceflight and can be part of longitudinal studies for future rodent missions.

For the NASA investigation, samples were provided to GeneLab by the Rodent Research-1 project. The investigation was funded by the NASA Space Biology Program Office, Space Life and Physical Sciences Research and Applications Division, and additional funding from the International Space Station Research Integration Office to the Space Biology GeneLab Project.

For the National Lab investigation, samples were provided to GeneLab by Dr. Sam Cadena (Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research) through the Rodent Research-1 project. This investigation was funded by the Center for Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS), the NASA Space Biology Program Office, Space Life and Physical Sciences Research and Applications Division and additional funding from the International Space Station Research Integration Office to the Space Biology GeneLab Project.

liver section
The Habitat module of the Rodent Research Hardware System, shown with both access doors open.
Credits: NASA / Dominic Hart
Transcriptomics, Epigenomics and Proteomics of Mouse Liver from the Rodent Research-1 Spaceflight Payload
Ruth Globus (RR-1 Project Scientist), CASIS National Lab, GeneLab
https://lsda.jsc.nasa.gov/scripts/experiment/exper.aspx?exp_index=13380

http://www.nasa.gov/ames/research/space-biosciences/rodent-research-1
Mus musculus
RNASeq, Whole Genome Bisulfite Sequencing, Proteomics
https://genelab-data.ndc.nasa.gov/genelab/search_studies/?q=RR1






October 29, 2015—

Space Shuttle Mission STS-135 Rodent Liver Transcriptomics Study

Researchers investigate the changes in gene expression patterns in mice flown on STS-135 using transcription profiling methods

This study provides a ground to microgravity comparative gene expression data set of female C57BL/6J mice utilizing transcriptional microarray technology. This data release in conjunction with data from previous studies in spleen and thymus using mice flown on the same mission, will allow researchers to perform network analyses that will help to gain a better understanding of the precise mechanisms that result in changes and possible health consequences associated with spaceflight.

This study was supported by the NASA Cooperative Agreement NNX10AJ31G “Cooperative Research in Proton Space Radiation", the LLUMC (Loma Linda University Medical Center) Department of Radiation Medicine and the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology. Liver samples were obtained through the NASA Biospecimen Sharing Program.
liver section
Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy of liver from mice flown aboard STS-135 compared with AEM ground controls show significantly more lipid accumulation, consistent with the up regulation of genes involved in triglyceride biosynthesis and lipid droplet formation measured in the flight mice.
STS-135 Liver Transcriptomics
Dr. Michael Pecaut
Rodent
Transcription Profiling Data
https://genelab-data.ndc.nasa.gov/genelab/accession/GLDS-25/






October 29, 2015—

New Data Available on the GeneLab Data System: Researchers Compare International Space Station Environmental Microbiome with That of Earth-Based Cleanrooms

Researchers use whole genome sequencing methods to investigate whether the viable microbiome associated with the International Space Station varies from the viable microbiomes of cleanrooms on Earth

Built environments like the ISS are known to have their own microbiomes. Next-generation sequencing methods are being used to explore the ISS microbial profile to enable the development of appropriate safety and maintenance practices. This study provides strong evidence that specific human skin-associated microorganisms constitute a significant population of the ISS microbiome, generating notable differences between the ISS microbiome and cleanrooms on Earth.

This research was funded by NASA Space Biology Grant no. 19-12829-27 under Task Order NNN13D111T award to K. Venkateswaran.

diagram of taxonomic profiles
Hierarchical clustering of samples using taxonomic profiles at the genus level. The taxonomic profiles are clustered based on sampling location. The color scale reflects log-normalized proportional values (e.g. - 1~10%, -2~1%, -3~0.1%). Rows and columns are clustered independently using the furthest neighbor algorithm with a Euclidean distance metric. o: order; f: family; g: genus
Microbiomes of the Dust Particles Collected from the International Space Station and Spacecraft Assembly Facilities
Dr. Kasthuri Venkateswaran
Environmental Samples
DNA Sequence Data
https://genelab-data.ndc.nasa.gov/genelab/accession/GLDS-26/






October 29, 2015—

Dr. Sarah Wyatt of Ohio University Partners with GeneLab on Arabidopsis RNA and Protein Profiling Study

Researchers investigate differences in gene and protein expression in Arabidopsis seedlings when grown in space and on the ground.

This study provides a ground-to-microgravity comparative gene expression analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. The core project examines global gene expression by RNASeq and the composition of the soluble protein fraction. The GeneLab collaboration augments the core investigation with an additional membrane protein data set. The data will allow researchers to perform network analyses to add to the knowledge of physiological effects of spaceflight during seedling growth.

This competitively selected study was funded by the NASA Space Biology Program Office, Space Life and Physical Sciences Research and Applications Division, NASA Taskbook Grant NNX13AM48G to Sarah Wyatt and additional funding from the International Space Station Research Integration Office to the Space Biology GeneLab Project.

photo of deintegration process
Colin Kruse (Ohio University) and Susan Manning-Roach (Kennedy Space Center), in a cold room at Kennedy Space Center, deintegrating the experiment after the spaceflight.
Proteomics and Transcriptomics Analysis of Arabidopsis Seedlings in Microgravity
Sarah Wyatt, Ph.D.; Ohio University
https://wyattlab.wordpress.com/
Arabidopsis thaliana
Mass Spectrometry Assay Data; RNA Sequence Data
https://genelab-data.ndc.nasa.gov/genelab/accession/GLDS-38/





October 29, 2015—

Dr. Simon Gilroy Partners with GeneLab on the Study of Ecotypic Variation in Plant Transcriptomes

Researchers investigate the transcriptional differences of four Arabidopsis ecotypes using RNA sequencing methods

The core study characterizes transcriptional patterns of Arabidopsis thaliana induced during germination and growth on the International Space Station. The GeneLab collaboration allows the comparative study of three additional ecotypes. This investigation will aid researchers in assessing the common and ecotype-specific effects of spaceflight on gene expression and will facilitate cross-study data comparisons with future experiments utilizing these strains. This data release includes 48 out of 56 sample expression files with the remaining 8 files to be released at a later date.

This competitively selected study was funded by the NASA Space Biology Program Office, Space Life and Physical Sciences Research and Applications Division, NASA Taskbook Grant No. NNX13AM50G to Simon Gilroy and additional funding from the International Space Station Research Integration Office to the Space Biology GeneLab Project.

seedlings in petri dish
Seedlings of the Columbia ecotype of Arabidopsis thaliana grown onboard the International Space Station and fixed at 8 days in RNAlater.
Comparison of the spaceflight transcriptome of four commonly used Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes
Dr. Simon Gilroy; University of Wisconsin - Madison
http://www.botany.wisc.edu/gilroy
Arabidopsis thaliana
RNA Sequence Data
https://genelab-data.ndc.nasa.gov/genelab/accession/GLDS-37/






October 29, 2015—

New Transcription Profiling Data Available on the GeneLab Data System

Identification of mechanosensitive genes in osteoblasts by comparative microarray studies using the rotating wall vessel and the random positioning machine

This study investigates the effects of microgravity during spaceflight on bone loss due in part to decreased bone formation by unknown mechanisms. Because it is difficult to perform experiments in space, researchers used ground-based simulators such as the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) and the Random Positioning Machine (RPM) to study the microgravity environment. In this study, researchers exposed 2T3 preosteoblast cells to the RWV for 3 days and found that alkaline phosphatase activity, a marker of differentiation, was inhibited. In addition, they found 61 genes downregulated and 45 genes upregulated by more than twofold compared to static 1 g controls, as shown by microarray analysis. These mechanosensitive genes may provide novel insights into understanding the mechanisms regulating bone formation and potential targets for countermeasures against decreased bone formation during spaceflight and in pathologies associated with lack of bone formation.

Transcription profiling of mouse osteoblasts under static vs simulated microgravity
Mus musculus
Transcription Profiling Data
https://genelab-data.ndc.nasa.gov/genelab/accession/GLDS-30/


Simulation Technique Reveals Delay in the Development of Fruit Flies When Exposed to Microgravity

Using an Earth-based microgravity simulation technique that utilizes a high gradient magnetic field to levitate a biological organism, researchers investigated the biological response to weightlessness in D. melanogaster. From these experiments, researchers observed a delay in the development of the fruit flies from embryo to adult. Microarray analysis indicated significant changes in the expression of immune-, stress-, and temperature-response genes.

Transcription profiling of Drosophila exposed to a levitation magnet for different lengths of time
Drosophila melanogaster
Transcription Profiling Data
https://genelab-data.ndc.nasa.gov/genelab/accession/GLDS-27/


Researchers use Genechip Technology to Investigate Effects of Microgravity on Murine Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

This study investigates the effects of microgravity on Murine Bone Marrow Stromal Cells (BMSC) that were flown to the International Space Station. The researchers use Genechip technology to detect differences in cell proliferation and cell-cycle genes between flight and control samples. This study represents the first report on the behavior of the potentially osteogenic murine BMSC in a 3D culture system.

Genechip analysis of bone marrow osteoprogenitors exposed to microgravity
Massimiliano Monticone
Mus musculus
Transcription Profiling Data
https://genelab-data.ndc.nasa.gov/genelab/accession/GLDS-29/


Bacillus subtilis Spores Exposed to Real Space Conditions

Spores of B. subtilis 168 were exposed to real space conditions and to simulated Martian conditions for 559 days in low Earth orbit mounted on the EXPOSE-E exposure platform outside the European Columbus module on the International Space Station. Upon return, spores were germinated, total RNA extracted and fluorescently labeled and used to probe a custom Bacillus subtilis microarray to identify genes preferentially activated or repressed relative to ground control spores. Using microarray technology, this study reveals a change in expression of stress-related regulons responding to DNA damage.

Bacillus subtilis spores, PROTECT experiment, Space-exposed and Mars-exposed vs. Earth-control
Wayne L. Nicholson
Bacillus subtilis
Transcription Profiling Data
https://genelab-data.ndc.nasa.gov/genelab/accession/GLDS-28/


MESSAGE 2 space experiment with Rhodospirillum rubrum S1H

Total RNA was extracted from R. rubrum S1H grown after 10 days in space flight or after 10 days in simulated ionizing radiation or simulated microgravity. Each microarray slide contained 3 technical repeats.

Researchers investigated both transcriptomic and proteomic changes in R. rubrum S1H cultures after a 10-day flight on the International Space Station and compared results to corresponding ground controls. Ground simulation of space ionizing radiation and space gravity were performed under identical culture setup and growth conditions encountered during the actual space journey. Whole-genome oligonucleotide microarray was used to test the effects of space flight. This study is unique in combining the results from an actual space experiment with the corresponding space ionizing radiation and modeled microgravity ground simulations, which allows distinguishing the different factors acting in spaceflight conditions.

MESSAGE 2 space experiment with Rhodospirillum rubrum S1H
Rhodospirillum rubrum
Transcription Profiling Data
https://genelab-data.ndc.nasa.gov/genelab/accession/GLDS-31/